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#1
User is offline   kcor 

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Does anyone know if there is a manual that tells what the standard should be for wire colors used in panels, etc.
I always use Red as +24
blk as -24
and I use blue or yellow for signal wires from input cards to output cards.

The reason I ask, is I met one of our electrical folks from one of our sister company's today and he has always used
Blue as +24
White as -24 ( because he refers to it as neutral), tried to explain to him that -24v is black, except in europe it is Brown +24
blue -24
black -siganal

Thanks
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#2
User is offline   ianbuckley 

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Standards vary between companies as well as countries.

However a fairly common standard:

Blk: >115VAC
Red: 115VAC
Wht: AC Neutral
Grn or Grn/Yel: Ground
Blu: +24VDC
Wht/Blu or Blu/Wht: DC Common
Yel or Org: Power from outside source
Brn: Analog or low voltage signals
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#3
User is offline   TechJunki 

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ianbuckley, on May 2 2005, 11:00 AM, said:

However a fairly common standard:

Blk: >115VAC
Red: 115VAC
Wht: AC Neutral
Grn or Grn/Yel: Ground
Blu: +24VDC
Wht/Blu or Blu/Wht: DC Common
Yel or Org: Power from outside source
Brn: Analog or low voltage signals

This too is generally the wire colors I use.... I also use Black for DC voltages greater than 24VDC, and Brown, Yellow, Orange for incoming line voltage, generally 3P 480V
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#4
User is offline   Chris Elston 

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The NFPA 79 has a chart.

Every type of machine has unique requirements when it comes to operator safety. From an electrical standpoint, industrial machine equipment and tools - from drill presses to multi-motored automatic machines - can present special fire and shock hazards. NFPA 79:

Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery, helps you ensure fire safety by addressing the electrical considerations specific to equipment, apparatus, and systems used in industrial manufacturing processes.

If you're working in an industrial setting, it's important for you to understand that wiring methods and practices outlined in NFPA 79 vary from the rules in the NEC. What are the differences between the two? Let's take a closer look at some specific requirements of NFPA 79 to find out.

Conductors (NFPA 79, Sec. 16.1.1). You must identify conductors at each termination so they match the identification markings on the diagrams attached to the machine.

Equipment-grounding conductors (NFPA 79, Sec. 16.1.2 and 16.1.3). You must use the color green, with or without one or more yellow stripes, to identify the equipment-grounding conductor (where insulated or covered). International and European standards require the use of a bicolor green-and-yellow for this purpose (see IEC 204-1 for specific requirements). You can use conductors of other colors, provided the insulation or cover is appropriately identified at all access points.

For grounded control circuits, you may use a green (with or without one or more yellow stripes) or a bare conductor to connect the transformer terminal to a grounding terminal on the control panel.

Sec. 16.1.3 allows you to use other colors for the purpose of identification as follows:

Black represents ungrounded line, load and control conductors at line voltage.

Red represents ungrounded AC control conductors, at less than line voltage.

Blue represents ungrounded DC control conductors.

Yellow represents ungrounded control circuit conductors that may remain energized when the main disconnecting means is in the OFF position. These conductors must be yellow throughout the entire circuit, including wiring in the control panel and the external field wiring. International and European Standards require you to use orange for this purpose (see IEC 204-1 for specific requirements).

White or natural gray represents a grounded circuit conductor.

White with blue stripe represents a grounded DC current-carrying circuit conductor. International and European standards require you to use light blue for the neutral conductor (see IEC 204-1 for specific requirements).

White with yellow stripe represents grounded AC current-carrying control circuit conductors that remain energized when the disconnecting means is in the OFF position. For additional circuits powered from different sources that remain energized when the main disconnecting means is in the OFF position, you must use striping colors other than green, yellow or blue to uniquely identify the grounded conductors.

Exceptions to Sec. 16.1.3 allow internal wiring on purchased wiring devices (or where multiconductor cable is used) to deviate from this color scheme. Where the insulation used is not available in the colors required (such as high temperature insulation, or chemically resistant insulation) the identification of conductors is not required.

Splices (NFPA 79, Sec. 16.1.4). You are required to run conductors and cables from terminal to terminal without splices. However, an exception allows you to install a splice in leads attached to electrical equipment, such as motors and solenoids.

Panel wiring (NFPA 79, Sec. 16.2). This section requires you to support conductors in panels to keep them in place. You're permitted to use wiring channels if they're made of a flame-retardant insulating material. If you're working with back-connected control panels, you must provide access doors or swing out panels that swing about a vertical axis. Multiple-device control panels must have terminal blocks or attachment plugs and receptacles to terminate and connect all outgoing control conductors.

Machine wiring (NFPA 79, Secs. 16 and 17). You must totally enclose conductors and their connection external to the control panel enclosure in suitable raceways or enclosures. Unless used for flexible connections involving small or infrequent movements, or connections to normally stationary motors, limit switches and other externally mounted devices, fittings used with raceways or multiconductor cables must be liquidtight.

Wire connectors and connections (NFPA 79, Sec. 16.4.1). You are required to use pressure connectors to connect conductors to devices with lug-type terminals that are not equipped with saddle straps or equivalent means of retaining conductor strands. Under certain conditions of use, the standard allows you to use solder connections and wire-wrapped connections, per Exceptions No. 1 and 2, Sec. 16.4.1.

Raceway fill (NFPA 79, Sec. 17.2). The combined cross-sectional area of all conductors and cables is not permitted to exceed 50% of the interior cross-sectional area of the raceway. The fill provisions are based on the actual dimensions of the conductors or cables used.

Junction and pull boxes (NFPA 79, Sec. 17.12). When constructing junction boxes and pull boxes, you must be careful to exclude materials such as dust, flyings, oil and coolant. After you complete all wiring operations, you must seal all unused knockouts or openings.

Conclusion. Modern electrical machine tool equipment may vary from that of a single-motor machine (such as a drill press that performs simple, repetitive operations) to very large, multimotored automatic machines, which contain highly complex electrical control systems. Typically, these machines are especially designed, factory-wired, tested by the builder and then erected in the plant.

You must install, support, and protect interconnection wiring from the supply circuit and between machines in accordance with the NEC and NFPA 79.
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User is offline   Chris Elston 

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We sort of follow these rules that pertain to voltage:

Conductor color coding High voltage (greater than 150 volts) power and motor conductors BLACK

Hot 115 VAC power, motor, control circuit, and programmable controller I/O conductors. RED

Neutral 115 VAC power, motor, control circuit, and programmable controller I/O conductors. WHITE

DC motor conductors. BROWN

24 VDC power, control circuit, and programmable controller I/O conductors (positive). BLUE

24 VDC common, (common). BLUE w/White Strip

All control circuits or wiring that may remain energized when the main disconnecting means is in the off position. YELLOW

Equipment grounding conductors (noncurrent-carrying) where insulated or covered. GREEN
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User is offline   gravitar 

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Don't forget that it seems to be a standard in DC molded cordsets to have brown for the DC+, blue for the DC-, and black for the signal. If there's a second signal wire, it is usually white.

I've seen some DC reed switches that used red for the DC+, black for the DC-, and white for the signal. I think the older Bimba switches followed that convention, but I think even they have come around in recent years.

It is a free-for-all when there are more than 4 conductors in the cable, each manufacturer seems to use whatever color (or striped color combinations) is available to them to identify the various conductors.
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User is offline   kcor 

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thanks to everyone

This site is the best
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#8
User is offline   kgeejay 

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View Postkcor, on May 11 2005, 03:58 AM, said:

thanks to everyone

This site is the best



what is british standard color code for 24 vdc can any tell the color?
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User is offline   Crossbow 

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Inside control panels I always see blue for +24 and blue with white stripe for -24. But in pre-assembled sensor cables, blue is positive and brown is negative. I've seen this even in panels built in the UK.
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User is offline   Paul B 

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View PostCrossbow, on Dec 13 2009, 11:15 PM, said:

Inside control panels I always see blue for +24 and blue with white stripe for -24. But in pre-assembled sensor cables, blue is positive and brown is negative. I've seen this even in panels built in the UK.


Don't you mean brown for positive and blue for 0vdc?

The reason I remember it is our panels always use blue for 24vdc (as posted above) and when I use a European sensor it stands out that the blue is the 0vdc, the brown is the +24vdc.
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User is offline   Crossbow 

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Yes I had them backwards, in pre-made cables the brown is positive and the blue is negative... Momentary lapse of sanity...
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#12
User is offline   Penko Mitev 

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I don't know of a common standard. Standards vary mainly between Europe and USA.

This is what me and my father use in our machines and it is the one we have decided ourselves(regarding inputs and outputs)

220 V - BROWN(most common for Bulgaria and Europe)
Neutral - BLUE

+ 24 -> RED
0V(-24) -> WHITE

Inputs - BLACK
Outputs - BROWN


This is because when we bought our last rolls of wire there was not a very big choice. However, I am thinking of changing the color of outputs so BROWN is used for phase(220V) only.
Every problem has a resolution. It depends on how smart you are to find the easiest one!
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#13
User is offline   marcinski 

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I believe you can basically use any wire color except green, green/yellow for wiring as long as color code is marked on electrical drawing.
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#14
User is offline   BobB 

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Here we go in Ozz
Red - white - blue for phases - black neutral.
Single phase red active and black neutral - or brown active and blue neutral.
Orange switched active.
Commonly grey 24VAC with black as neutral or 0V.
I could list a heap more common itinerations.
I use pink for 24VDC and violet for 0VDC.
Can list plenty of others by the way.
The Old Pfhaart

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User is offline   Ken Moore 

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I use UL 508A as my color standard.




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